What could equitable development look like in Detroit’s food movement?

Tostada Magazine
Friday, Jul 13, 2018
What could equitable development look like in Detroit’s food movement?

“Be consistent, be humble, be great, working together collectively, start by listening,” Devita Davison, Executive Director of FoodLab told the intimate Urban Consulate audience. “These principles will guide us into our developments going forward, using food as the conduit to create equitable food-oriented development.”

The subject at Urban Consulate came about as members of FoodLab unpacked the lessons learned at the Dream Cafe, a convening of dozens of folks in the culinary, activism, agriculture, indigenous, PoC and LGBTQ worlds at Cass Cafe during the 20th Allied Media Conference. Most who participated in the days-long event described the Dream Cafe as a grand experiment that tested what a more equitable food world that honors identity and culture could look like in Detroit and beyond.

The takeaways after the four-day pop-up were many, from aspiring restaurateurs pledging to source their ingredients from local black-owned urban farms to chefs from out of town leaving Detroit in awe of the city’s legacy of self-determined foodways.